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    installing cylinder heads


    Is there a possibility of installing cylinders heads with the valves 180 degrees off? I'm about to put on two heads. ROM says to make sure no. 2 cylinder is at TDC. and make sure line on camshaft flange is in line with groove on no. 1s camshaft bearing. The ROM talks about checking that a line on the flywheel lines up with the mark on the flywheel housing. I'm assuming this implies no. 2 piston is at TDC. The only thing is my flywheel does not have such a mark.
    Sujit

    #2
    Providing you have the right camshaft in the right head (and left camshaft in the left head!) - they are marked, and line the the grooves on the camshaft flange up with the groove in the top of the cam bearing cap then there should not be a problem.

    For TDC, yes, just make sure no. 2 piston is at TDC - I usually use a DTI mounted on the block face to make absolutely sure it is spot on. (easy as you have the heads off). Once set up you could always mark the flywheel and back plate with a centre punch in case you need it later. - might also be worth temporarily fitting the timing cover and front pulley to check the accuracy of the timing pointer used for setting ignition timing.

    Hard to get wrong really - famous last words

    Roger
    So many cars, so little time!

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      #3
      Thx Roger, Years back I had to have a head rebuilt on my current running Stag. Cam sprocket stripped and valves go bent. Only had one head off. Reassembled, the car didn't start. Got nervous, then someone suggested reinstalling the distributor 180 in the opposite orientation. Car stated, but major noise. The alternator was interfering with the water pipe.

      Sujit

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        #4
        It is possible to time the cam one revolution out, I managed it a few years ago when re-shimming the valve clearances.

        Because the cam only rotates once for every two turns of the crank, it is possible to have the engine on TDC by the timing marks on the front pulley, but if the opposite cam cover has not been removed to ensure the other cam is correctly timed, the cam could be 180 degrees out.
        Nothing will be damaged as the cam is correctly timed to the movement of the pistons but when it will only run on four cylinders because the rotor arm is no longer pointing at the correct cylinder, you will wonder what you have done!

        Neil
        Neil
        TV8, efi, fast road cams and home built manifolds. 246bhp 220lbft torque

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          #5
          flipping heck Neil that must have been fun

          Only thing to add to Sujit is that he needs to be careful that both chains go on perfectly. Easy to get one of them one tooth out. In the past I have had to use a spanner on the end of the cam to rotate it slightly (like 1/2 a tooth) so that the chain goes on the right tooth. then cranked by hand two complete revolutions to check that it is still correct.

          Also Sujit - stripped a cam sprocket! was that what the noise was?

          Stags and Range Rover Classics - I must be a loony

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            #6
            Yep... I did that as well one cam 180Deg out....ran rather roughly
            1976 Triumph V8 Manual/OD in BRG

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              #7
              Sorry I stripped a crank sprocket . Here's a photo. Also here's a photo of a cam shaft sprocket with the hole slightly off which I got once.

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                #8
                Ha..

                I seem to remember an engine where the sprocket was deliberately misaligned a little, it gave you the chance to mount it face forward or face backward to give a measure of adjustment.

                TR? Mini?

                Terry
                Terry Hunt, Wilmington Delaware

                www.terryhunt.co.uk

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